Infographics, new media, social media trends, stats

It’s not just about television anymore [infographic]

I found this infographic and loved it! Full of information for presentations!

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branding, social media trends, stats

Gmailers more engaged according to MailChimp/MarketingCharts

According to a MailChimp survey reported by MarketingCharts, people who use Gmail have an email open rate of 30.94% compared to Hotmail with 23.79%, Yahoo with 25.54% and AOL with 20.09%.

Another interesting survey tid-bit is that Gmailers have a click rate of 7.41% compared to the less than 5% for the others mentioned above.

It clear to me that Gmailers demonstrate a willingness to try something new and this open-mindedness can be reflected right back to Google as a company.

As humans, we tend to be attracted to other like-minded people and somehow Google has managed to do just that but as a brand. That’s very powerful. Google consistently offers alternative online experiences and for those who want come along for the ride and don’t mind the numerous beta products; there are benefits, bonuses and advantages.

In the end, it’s up to you where you click and whatever email client you choose to use, but one thing seems to stand out, Gmail users have drank the Google coolaid – so yeah, it is a “demographic kinda thing”.

branding, social media trends, stats

Where do consumers search for information

Consumers rely on social media websites as much as company websites for product information, and 70% of consumers have visited a social media website such as message board, social network, instant messenger, blog, video sharing site or chat room in order to get information about a company, brand or product.dei-otx-where-consumers-search-information-fall-2008

This just confirms the value of advertising on social media sites.  The price is right and it’s a great opportunity to get more eyes on your product.

N’est pas ?

online shopping, stats

Cyber Monday 2008 vs 2007

2007 2008 Growth
Dollars (mln of $) $733 $846 15%
Number of Buyers, 000 7,585 9,254 22%
Dollars per Buyer $96.62 $91.43 -5%
Average Transaction Value $53.89 $55.76 3%
Transactions per Buyer 1.79 1.64 -9%
Source: comScore

Did you choose to shop online this year?  If so, what were you shopping for? Personally, I bought books and DVD’s.  It was easier and cheaper.  🙂

social media trends, stats

Here’s a clue who to innovate for

http://www.emarketer.com/Article.aspx?id=1006741eMarketer estimates that 82% of US teens ages 12 to 17 and 43.5% of children ages 3 to 11 will use the Internet on a monthly basis in 2009.

“This audience navigates between a multitude of electronic options for communication, including social networks, text messaging, instant messaging and virtual worlds,” says Debra Aho Williamson, eMarketer senior analyst and author of the new report, Kids and Teens: Communication Revolutionaries. “They expect transitions between communications media to be seamless—messages sent by one means ought to be accessible in another.”

In fact, the distinctions many adults make between “online,” “offline” and “mobile” communications are meaningless to these young multimedia mavens.

“Kids and teens just communicate, period,” says Ms. Williamson.

What tools they use to interact are less important than how simple the interaction is, how seamlessly they can move across devices and how engaging the experience is.

“Marketers have never confronted a faster-moving or more elusive audience,” Ms. Williamson says.

Remember that tweens and teens are an extremely powerful and influential part of today’s economy.  I like to call it the Tween Economy and they are indeed an economy of scale.  I’m curious if anyone will put the two together in the next 18 to 36 months.

social media trends, stats

A little ad here and there – No problem!

transverse-idg-willing-view-ads-mobile-phone-exchange-incentive-fall-2008Nearly two-thirds (61%) of mobile users say they would be willing to view advertising on their mobile phone in return for a discount on their monthly bill, according to a survey commissioned by Transverse and conducted by iGR.

I know I’d do it in a heart beat.  Would YOU?

More findings:

  • Regardless of incentive, the majority of respondents who would accept one (71%) say they would view up to five ads per day.
  • Mobile users under age 35 were most receptive to advertisements on their mobile device in exchange for discounts on their monthly service bill.
  • 46% of those surveyed said that a 25-50% discount on their monthly bill would be enough of an incentive to provide access to their usage patterns – including browsing, email and texting habits and location – but not personal information such as the content of texts and emails.
  • Younger users age 8-25, who are more apt to text, are among the most willing to let mobile companies track and release the number of text messages they send/receive in exchange for ad viewing.
  • Those age 26-44, who are more apt to talk, are most willing to allow mobile operators to document and disperse details about their voice usage in exchange for discounted services.

Let’s face it, when we can save money we’ll put up just about anything.  Make it free… that might get really interesting!

new media, stats

Generation V: Majority of Internet Users are Lurkers!

I often check out MarketingCharts to observe online statistics and stumbled upon an interesting report from Gartner concerning Generation V last week.

This report attempts to outline and categorize internet users.  Apparently, we are either creators, contributors, opportunists or lurkers.

Although I agree for the most part, I’m not sure it’s that clear cut.  As for myself, I believe I have elements of each a creator, a contributor and an opportunist – I’m not sure who would admit to being a lurker (but that’s just me I suppose).  What about you?

These are the findings directly from the report:

Findings about these Generation V segments:

  • Up to 3% will be creators, providing original content. They can be advocates that promote products and services.
  • Between 3% and 10% will be contributors who add to the conversation, but don’t initiate it. They can recommend products and services as customers move through a buying process, looking for purchasing advice.
  • Between 10% and 20% will be opportunists, who can further contributions regarding purchasing decisions. Opportunists can add value to a conversation that’s taking place while walking through a considered purchase.
  • Approximately 80% will be lurkers, essentially spectators, who reap the rewards of online community input but absorb only what is being communicated. They can still implicitly contribute and indirectly validate value from the rest of the community. All users start out as lurker.

Please feel free to comment on this.  I’d love to see if I’m the only one who thinks these findings are slightly generalist.